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“L-E-D”. When it comes to lighting, you’re hearing these three letters over and over again… you see it posted all over lighting websites, and its starting to bug you. It seems to be an exciting new trend…some kind of new innovative light…but you have no idea what it is. You’d like to know what everybody’s talking about- what’s all the rage?

LED’s – Light Emitting Diodes – Simply put, LED’s are diodes that…(huh?) hang on, I’ll explain: a diode is the simplest sort of semiconductor device best led grow lights for sale of 2022. (what’s that?) wow, you’re impatient: A semi-conductor is a material with the ability to conduct electrical current. Basically, instead of emitting light from a vacuum (as in an incandescent bulb) or a gas (as in a CFL), LED emits light from a piece of solid matter, its semi-conductor. Stated very simply, an LED produces light when electrons move around within its semiconductor structure.

They tell you when to stop and go. They have ruled your driving, saved your life countless times, and that little red man made you wait around till you were able to cross the street. That’s right – the red, yellow and green on the traffic lights are Led lights right in front of your nose. In fact, Light Emitting Diodes have been around for some time, conceptualized in 1907. However, it wasn’t until the 1960s that practical applications were found and LED’s were first manufactured. LED used to be used exclusively for traffic signals, brake lights and headlights on luxury cars, and indicator lights on appliances. You probably didn’t even know that LED lights were lighting up your digital clocks, flashlights and telling you when you’ve got a new voice message on your cell phone. Expensive at the start, as applications grew, benefits were discovered and manufacturing costs went down. According to the American Lighting Association (ALA), lighting manufacturers have invested considerable time, effort and research into adapting this super energy-efficient technology for household use. The technology has advanced enough to win approval from the government’s popular and well-respected Energy Star® program. So here’s why:

Whereas the market for colored (Red, Green, Blue) RGB LEDs is well established, the market for white LEDs is still growing. Why? When you think of industries that still rely on white, non-LED lighting, such as televisions, automotive manufacturers, computer monitors, notebook computers, LCD backlights, etc., you can understand the push to become the leader in white LED manufacturing. Many people are surprised that a business would pass up a revenue generating opportunity that converting a home or business to LED would create. However, just because replacement white LED bulbs and retrofits are finally on the market, does not mean that they should be on your immediate shopping list. In very simple terms, the market for colored and color-changing LEDs is mature. While engineers are still finding ways to make them brighter and more efficient, the holy grail of the LED industry is in developing volume production of high-efficiency, high-brightness white LEDs.

It may be easier to think of colored LEDs (RGB) and white LEDs in terms of another industry: Automotive. RGB LEDs are like the internal combustion engine: Reliable, abundant, easy to use and manufacture, and fairly well developed in terms of the potential for new or breakthrough technologies. There are lots on manufacturers and each has their own set of patents and “tricks of the trade” to help give themselves some marketing leverage over the competition. White LEDs are like the alternative energy industry for transportation: Quite varied, still relatively “new”, still needing to be market proven, more expensive, more challenging to manage. There are many manufacturers, each using a different technology or combination of technologies to achieve what they believe is the “the next big thing.” Following this analogy, RGB LEDs are mature enough to compete on cost alone and the drop in costs is what fuels new applications for colored LEDs that had not been thought of previously. White LEDs, on the other hand are still developing technically and should not be shopped based on cost alone. The need for quality and longevity is what fuels the further research and development into white LEDs

The media has made us aware of environmental issues such as global warming, greenhouse gas emissions, air pollution, and many more issues concerning our natural resources. We hear so much about recycling and going green. The new technology in light bulbs has an answer to reducing all of these planet-damaging issues. LED light bulbs also have the answer to how to lower your electric bill. Let’s take a look at some of the simple facts.

The initials LED stand for light emitting diodes. The technology, development, and production of LED light bulbs have now made them an affordable, money-saving alternative to traditional incandescent lighting. The compact fluorescent bulb has won the hearts of many homeowners because of its energy efficiency. This is the spiral-shaped light bulb that can be seen in many homes today. Although this new compact fluorescent bulb present many advantages, the LED bulbs far surpass both the incandescent bulb and the compact fluorescent bulb in many categories.

The average lifespan of an LED bulb is 50,000 hours compared to the compact fluorescent bulb at 8,000 hours and the incandescent comes in last at 1,200 hours. The same period of time that it takes a 60 watt incandescent bulb to use 60 watts, the CFL (compact fluorescent bulb) will use 13-15 watts, and the LED will use 6-8 watts. Based on average use of 30 light bulbs of 60 watt strength, the operating costs for each type of bulb would be: incandescent bulbs – $328.59/year, CFL bulbs – $76.65/year, and LED bulbs – $32.85/year. The savings with LED lighting are substantial.

What about the environmental impact of each type lighting? Based on the average use of 30 bulbs, the incandescent bulbs gives off 4500 pounds of carbon dioxide emissions each year. The CFL lighting gives off a considerably lower 1051 pounds per year. The LED gives off only 451 pounds per year. This is because the LED bulbs do not heat up like the incandescent and CFL bulbs. The heat produces energy consumption which releases carbon dioxide, sulfur oxide, and nuclear waste into the atmosphere. Also the LED and incandescent lighting contain no mercury or any other toxic substance. The CFL bulbs do contain levels of mercury which is very toxic to your health and the environment.

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